MAYOR & GOVERNOR AT FAULT FOR CHARLOTTESVILLE VIOLENCE---attempt to cover up their culpability w


Alt-right demonstrators march again in Charlottesville, Virginia, October 8, 2017, as city's mayor threatens legal action (photo: Reuters)

Alt-right demonstrators pictured in brief rally in Charlottesville as city council, businesses and community organizations filed a lawsuit to stop "paramilitary" activity (photo: Reuters, October 8, 2017).

A lawsuit was filed by Georgetown Law's Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection in Washington, D.C. claiming that "paramilitary groups should be subject to the government and to the people." The Charlottesville council voted to join the complaint that aims to prevent white supremacists and paramilitary groups from returning to Charlottesville.

Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer read a statement expressing his support of the suit. He put out an earlier and angry Twitter, telling alt-right leader Richard Spencer and the protesters to "go home," adding that this (Oct. 8th rally) is "another despicable visit by neo-Nazi cowards." "These folks arrogantly, violently, and recklessly believe they can disrupt and replace the state itself," said Mayor Signer.

Mayor Signer's angry and biased words echoed the same sentiments expressed two months earlier by Virginia Commonwealth's Governor, Terry McAuliffe, in response to the August demonstrations and violence telling the alt-right to "go home and never come back."

However, what is revealing about this lawsuit is that other defendants in the lawsuits include two left-leaning groups who attended the rally "armed to protect counter-protesters," according to the lawsuit.

The suit claims private militias and alt-right groups came to the city strictly to provoke violence. Mayor Mike Signor read in a statement "...these paramilitary groups in the public sphere [are] a threat to Democracy."

The suit is being brought by the city, several downtown businesses and neighborhood associations.

Legal analyst Scott Goodman said the lawsuit could face a challenge in court because it could be seen as placing limits on free speech and the right to bear arms.

One has to raise the question, why were the two opposing groups allowed to confront each other in the first place? Why were the two groups not separated by several thousand feet or more? Why were the counter protesters allowed to march without legal permits?

The City of Charlottesville and its mayor, Michael Signer, and the state of Virginia, and its governor, Terry McAuliffe, should shoulder the blame. If a congressional investigation is conducted and the facts demonstrate that these two government executives did not take the necessary steps and precautions to avoid such a confrontation and assure that freedoms were protected, then the major and governor should be held criminally liable and accountable in a court of law.

In America, protesters have a legal and constitutional right to assemble and have freedom of speech. It is their right, no matter the message! The leftists denied them that constitutional freedom. For all of Trump's lying and distortion of the truth during his campaign and in the first nine months of his presidency, his claim that "There is blame on both sides," seems, ironically, to be accurate.

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